Categories: Fruit & Vegetable Gardening

Fruiting Cherry trees

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Nothing epitomizes the start of spring more than the arrival of the pink, white and purple blooms of fast growing cherry trees – one of the most spectacular sights of this time of year in my mind. Not only will these hardy trees provide plenty of colour and architectural interest but they will also yield plenty of delicious fruits!

Good varieties to try:

Cherry ‘Sunburst’Prunus avium (Sweet Cherry, Patio fruit tree)

  • High quality, dark red almost black large dessert cherries of the sweetest flavour which will store well for a short period after picking.
  • Cherry Sunburst has ‘Gisella 7’ rootstock which produces good fruit size, but with compact growth so that it can be grown in a small space.
  • Being self-fertile it is ideal for small gardens planted in a warm sunny spot in a large container on the patio.
  • Ready to harvest slightly earlier than Stella from mid-July.

‘Stella’Prunus avium (Sweet Cherry, Patio fruit tree)

  • Britain’s best-known dessert cherry, bred in Canada and reliably produces firm, dark red flesh fruits with the sweetest flavour.
  • As Cherry Stella is self-fertile, it is ideal for growing in small gardens or in containers on a sunny patio.
  • Ready to harvest from Mid July to August.
  • Unlike traditional cherry trees the modern ‘Gisela 6’ rootstock has meant that varieties are these days very productive with good fruit size, but with compact growth so that it can be grown in a small space, either free standing or trained against a wall or fence or planted in containers on the patio.

‘Griotella’Prunus cerasus

  • A naturally dwarf tree with an attractive weeping habit, Griotella looks stunning when in blossom and will produce a heavy crop of fruits.
  • The sweet tasting fruits have a delicious bite and cook very well – especially tasty baked in a cherry pie! Self-fertile. Rootstock: Colt.
  • Cherries make an attractive tree both in flower or when laden with fruit.

‘Crown Morello’Prunus cerasus (Acid Cherry, Sour Cherry, Patio fruit tree)

  • The largest of the cooking cherries, with very juicy dark red fruits for cooking in pies, making jams or used to make your own wine or Cherry Brandy.The trees are self-fertile and grow very well against a north facing wall or in a container on the patio, producing a bumper crop from late August onward.
  • Unlike traditional cherry trees the modern ‘Gisela 5’ rootstock has meant that varieties are these days very productive with good fruit size, but with compact growth so that it can be grown in a small space, either free standing or trained against a wall or fence or planted in containers on the patio.

 ‘Merton Glory’Prunus avium (Sweet Cherry, Patio fruit tree)

  • An exceptional and early-ripening cherry variety, Cherry Merton Glory produces large, yellow cherries, flushed with red, which will be ready for picking in late June.
  • Attractive white flowers in April to May are followed by delicious ‘heart-shaped’ cherries with a firm white inner flesh and a succulent sweet flavour with a small stone.

Important: Requires Morello Cherry to assist with pollination.

James Middleton

An obsessive gardener since 1982. Day-time job - web designer and developer and University lecturer.

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James Middleton
Tags: Colourful FlowersGrowing FruitOrnamental GardenSmall garden

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